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Course units

Course unit - Kipling, Forster and India

Code : ENGL31111
Credit rating: 20
Semester : 1

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Aims | Objectives | Assessment | Information * | Course unit content |
Course unit materials | Tutors | Timetable | Teaching methods | Keywords


Aims

• To explore writing about India in the 1880-1950 period by British and Indian writers, and later film adaptations of Kipling and Forster;
• To introduce students to relevant work in colonial discourse theory, postcolonial studies and work on the relationship between modernism and empire;
• To consider the texts discussed in relation to issues of gender, sexuality, nation, race, and class;
• To develop students’ skills in close analysis, and an attentiveness to issues of form and language, in short stories, novels and film adaptation;
• To develop students’ skills of written expression and production of coherent arguments, at a level appropriate to work that will form part of the final assessment;
• To develop students skills of oral expression.

Objectives (learning outcomes)

By the end of this course students should be able to:
• Have a knowledge and understanding of a range of the writing about India in the 1880-1950 period by British and Indian writers, and later film adaptations;
• Have the ability to use, and relate the texts discussed to debates in, colonial discourse theory, postcolonial studies and work on the relationship between modernism and empire;
• The relationships between the writing under discussion and issues of gender, sexuality, nation, race and class.
• Have an ability to construct and defend complex arguments through textual evidence (literary, historical, and / or theoretical), in written assessment and in seminar discussions;
• Be able to communicate effectively with peers in seminar and small group situations;
• Be able to demonstrate appropriate written skills for contributions to the final degree classification.
• Have an ability both to read closely with discrimination and to relate literary texts to wider cultural and theoretical issues;
• Have enhanced skills of comparison and analysis shown by the ability to compare different kinds of texts and the different purposes and audiences they served, in seminar discussion and in written work;

• Have skills in the use of all relevant library resources, databases and search engines, to locate material for discussion, presentation and assessment purposes;
• Have an ability to plan and carry out independent research projects shown in the formative presentation and in the assessed coursework essay;
• Have the ability to participate productively in the seminar discussions and to work independently (in the assessed essay and examination);
• The development of enhanced analytical skills and skills of written and verbal communication and argument;
• Show evidence of skills in close reading necessary to appreciate the complexities of the texts studied;
• Show evidence of skills in close reading necessary to appreciate the complexities of the texts studied;
• Have the ability to participate productively in the seminar discussions and to work independently (in the assessed essay and examination);
• The development of enhanced analytical skills and skills of written and verbal communication and argument

Assessment

One 3,000-word essay (50%); one 2-hour unseen written examination (50%)

The use of dictionaries in the examination is prohibited. This rule applies to all categories of students, including all Visiting Students.

Information *


THIS COURSE IS NOT AVAILABLE AS FREE-CHOICE

Course unit content

Colonial India was central to the writing of both Rudyard Kipling and E.M. Forster. There are, though, many differences between these two writers. These include their politics – one the ‘laureate of Empire’, the other a liberal critic of how the Empire was run – and the form taken by their writing. After Kipling’s Kim (1901), and Forster’s A Passage to India (1924) we examine how Indian writers in English of the late colonial or immediate post-independence context responded to the various tropes laid down by Kipling, Forster and British writers about India - or how they sought to take Indian writing in English in a wholly different direction. Colonial discourse analysis, post-colonial studies approaches and work on the relationship between modernism and empire are all utilized, as is a concern with ‘Raj nostalgia’, which is approached through film adaptations of Kipling and Forster. In addition, the course is attentive to issues of class, sexuality and gender, and there is an emphasis on issues of form and language.

Indicative schedule:
Week 1 Rudyard Kipling, ‘The Man Who Would be King’
Week 2 Rudyard Kipling, Kim (I)
Week 3 Rudyard Kipling, Kim (II)
Week 4 E.M. Forster, A Passage to India (I)
Week 5 E.M. Forster, A Passage to India (II)
Week 6 Reading Week
Week 7 Katherine Mayo’s Mother India (excerpts) and theory week
Week 8 Rabindranath Tagore, The Home and the World
Week 9 Mulk Raj Anand, The Untouchable
Week 10 R.K. Narayan, The English Teacher
Week 11 G.V. Desani, All About H Hatterr
Week 12 The Empire on screen: The Man Who Would be King (dir. John Huston, 1975) and A Passage to India (dir. David Lean, 1984).

Course unit materials

Tutor(s)

Booth, Howard Dr

Timetable

PROVISIONAL TIMETABLE FOR 2013-2014

lecture: Friday 12.00-1.00
seminar: Friday 2.00-4.00

Teaching methods

One hour lecture and two hour seminar per week. There will be a course booklet.

Preliminary reading

Primary texts: Kim (ed. Trivedi, Penguin); A Passage to India (Penguin text from the Abinger edition); Tagore, The Home and the World (trans. Surendranath Tagore, Penguin); Mulk Raj Anand, The Untouchable (Penguin); R.K. Narayan, The English Teacher (Vintage); G.V. Desani, All About H Hatterr (NYRB).
Initial suggested secondary texts:
Richard Allen and Harish Trivedi, eds., Literature and Nation: Britain and India, 1800-1990 (London: Routledge, 2001).
Elleke Boehmer and Rosinka Chaudhuri, eds., The Indian Postcolonial: A Critical Reader (London: Routledge, 2010)
Howard J. Booth, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Rudyard Kipling (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011).
Howard J. Booth and Nigel Rigby, eds., Modernism and Empire (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2000).
David Bradshaw, ed. The Cambridge Companion to E.M. Forster (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007).
Priyamvada Gopal, The Indian English Novel: Nation, History and Narration (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009)
Fredric Jameson, ‘Modernism and Imperialism’, Seamus Deane et. al., Nationalism, Colonialism, and Literature (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1990), 43–66.
Bart Moore-Gilbert, Kipling and Orientalism (London: Croom Helm, 1986).
Peter Morey, Fictions of India: Narrative and Power (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2000).
Benita Parry, Postcolonial Studies: a Materialist Critique (London: Routledge, 2004).
Caroline Rooney and Kaori Nagai, eds., Kipling and Beyond: Patriotism, Globalisation and Postcolonialism (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2010).
Edward W. Said, Culture and Imperialism (London: Chatto & Windus, 1993).
Mohammad Shaheen, E. M. Forster and the Politics of Imperialism (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004).
Sara Suleri, The Rhetoric of English India (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992)

Keywords

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